Letters from James Joseph Makin to his family 1918 - Part 5 of 6

Conflict:
First World War, 1914–18
Part of Quest:
Subject:
  • Letters
Status:
Awaiting approval
Accession number:
RCDIG0001462
Difficulty:
2

Page 1 / 10

IEM I left Years tos mare that wit is my battation a his more and Arme did tooka5 Perpaps few taks. You will think that I do not consider o yours feelings and that I am iconsideratey but ovelaces Lones on repeat tong to the Wars sell one and Runkind siced n e I could not love thee half so well Loved I not honor more. were evert so much better to It be stoical and should bad news ever reach you, I bear is as did the Spartan mothers ancient freecs I cannot write more now so will concinden with loventh all you dear people ats home. Believe me, I am always thinking of you. Your affectionate To Mr TORIET
Mo. 1 Command Depot. 6.9. 18. Ennow Ver My dearest Mother, The day after I last wrote to you I heard that Les had been wounded, but I have delayed writing on the offchance of inding out the nature of his wounds. He was wounded on 25/8, and chifted from the 61st C.C.S. to the 8th General Hospital, I am expecting any Ronen on 31/8. day. to hear he has been evacuated to England; and hope such will be the case before the 13th when I go on four I was to days leave to London. have gone Yesterday, but have delayed it a week on hearing the news. I daresay you know by now, and I sincerely hope you will not worry overmuch dear mother, and break down I have been worried a your health. of on your account, but great deal await definite news. Of course I nsfortune before taking myshing to always look at it in the heart. O it will mean a hup to light that
2 Rushalia for a certainly, and hope his wounds will not prove too serious. shall send you a cable from London next weekend, when I have difmnite news about Lies should I had a letter from him on the and As 20t Aug. I saidon. Rubys letter, The fighting was pretty severe Although an troops have done so well. I cannot help feeling sorry to think you will have the news about my returning to France about the time you hear of Les being wounded. It so just circumstance, and I trust you will prove as brave as You have always been, and rely on prayers. Up wll now we have been very fortmate and there is no reason to think our hick is going to Change. strings are running smoothly here, and my arm is alright again. I hope I shall have good news for you next mail; and will conclude with much love to all from Your affectionate son di 2 0014
No 1 Command Depot Sutton Deny, Willshire 9.9.18. My deares Mother & Father, Long before you receive this letter, which You I write with a heart ready to break, poor old Les has will have heard that made the supreme sacrifice for his country. I have been expecting this sad news the nrights, for ten long days and day or so being tension during the last you hear of When Almost unbearable. The name of hro wounds you will know as I fully realizze now, That it is I had a wire from London better so. this afternoon to say Las died at the Roner I have tried Yesterday. 8t Gen. Hosp, ever sice leaving hospital (6 days) to fet leave to get across and see him, got a defmite decision. had not but felting the were today. up hll I hope, dear parents, you will Now take a hrave view of our Misforhure Some Consolation in and try t derive died in the most knowing that Lees
noble and honorable way, no defenced of a his country, fighting in an unquestionably just cause. It ro true that me only realize the most fearful and cruel aspect of war when our own blood is moowed, and When sons are lost to their parents S. and brothers to sisters and brothers. I thank God Lees had not a Es wife and kiddies depending on him. be thankfue you have shll 8 You must 3 to be some sons and daughbers Comfort to you. I feel too upset to write further lonight, but I shall write again in a day or so, when I am more at lase. The memory of our last parting; The few have words and strong crp; are to fresh. Kest assured I shall find out you all the news I can and let know as soon as possible. I shall not be leaving Ingland for at least a month, perhaps not at all now. Love to all from Your affectionate son TOMIEHEY Ir 8 7146
1189 No. 1 Command Depot Suron Very Wilks 269 18. ty dear Mother, I ame still at this You will see depot, and my stay has been much epected. tar nge I have not had any letters from home Nc I last wrote. 14 July, the latest There should be- more letters shortly. wet and Hormy, the weather io still as one must expect at the Ttime of an equinon D have started the Toosball season and played a already match against the Framing Banalion. Yesterday Ths 5 5 I officers pals of They recognised against ns playing me and spoke very kndly. Three or four other 5t Brs chaps lamented the loss of hes as one of the battations very best. I hope you will not think it was out of place for me to be playing A0 soon but you will undersland
that fell so worried that I was 8 had of a same to forget for a while Somehow I am Always thinking of You now, dear mother, and wondering you are goining, or bearing up af against misfortune as behoves bravely chapa at to mother of hes was. I daresay You gop my cable alright. Pssikly . You had a ninfieaio from Defence previousty. There is absolutely no news to tell you from This side. The sews from Faleste and t Back no very encouraging, and the Westerm front his quietened Rown. wrile again. Thortly. I shall Dest love to all at home Your affectional m IDRL 474 dim DRIE
A0 Pay Office No. 1. Command Depot, Sulton Verry, Wills 11 18 My dearest Mother o all at home I have just returned from five days leave to Slfracombe North Devon, with Gay It was at his suggestion that Burston I never having and we made the trips Devonshire readily assented. We been th quiet time enjoying the had bruzer a magnificent scenery and the good food there. For the which is fairly plenhful first time since leaving home I lasted geat cream. Devonshirre Clotted, and believe me it was hard to take (I don't thinks We gourneyed ma Bath and Bristol and on my return I spent a few hours looking around the latter City. I have Slpacombe and some post card views of Bristol, which I shall write on and send within a few days. The weather, which is so uncertain at this time of the year, kept fine, - at Ot least io did not rain much Douring now to make up for it) 2 The visiting season to Depacombe. ended in September and instead of between $30,000 and $40,000 visitors, we found passed. Most We almost. Deserted. it augged cliffs climbing. the of the time which skirt the Bristol Channel at this sets a fine From the cliffs one part. view across the thannel to South Wales of the chipping and a view hids eye bardiff, Swansea to journeying to and fro and Bristol
A0 The mine sweepers continue their patiol all day long and sometimes at night. May German submarines have met Therr fate about here. Your on my return I received Post bard of 23rd Aug. and letter of 16th Sept. the latter is the letter written just after you had the sad news about Les. cannot tell you how much I feel for you dearest mother, and I can well mmagine the floom The news has thrown over our home, just when you were living m such high hoper of his return. I am surprised to hear that hes was Merely reported wounded. The youss reporr was dangerously wounded and I have already told you of the fearful suspense I endured for ten I think I told you I long days. det a Bddle Park boy. nramed Maher who was with Jack Barry. He was one of four who carried Les to the that he dressing station. He said was conscious and wonderfully Calm and brave, until they gave him morphia from think that at the G.C.O. under This time Bwards he was kept Morphia, and did not suffer the fearful agony which his wounds would I have told you that he indicate. at Konen, and that probably is buried be able io visit his grave befor Shall home leave
3 It is florious news this morning that Turkey has surrendered and that an allied fleet is to proceed to Constantmople and the Black Lea. Later. Jack Barry has just called in The came back of furlough this morning Edinburgh, Glasgow and after Youring got some further information Te London. follows:- hees as for me about Bend Eh Makin 5 Bn. This officer was evacuated wounded or 25/8/18 advice received by this unid regarding his death is as follows:- Died of Wounds 8 Gen. Hosp. Sim shot wounds both legs right imputated 18/9/18. Previously reported dangerously ill This officer was leading his company on the attack on 23/8/18, when he was struck by a shell. Major C.O. 5 Bor B.1.F. Eopy of 19 16 Lount G. L Makin St On B.1.F. The late hund G. L. Makon was admitted mnb. This hospital. on the 31st August 1918, suffering from. G.T.W. both legs Compulation of right) and died at 9-30 am. on the 1918 8t Sept. He was buried in the St. Lever Cemetery Ronen on. 10 Sept. 1918 Grave No. 6218 Major RAMC. C.O. S. Gen Hosp. Roven

                    2

 

Two years now since I left 

my battalion, and that it is

time I did a bit more and

took a few risks.  Perhaps 

you will think that I do not

consider your feelings and

that I am inconsiderate, but

I repeat Lovelace's "Lines in

Going to the Wars" :—

   "Tell me not sweet I am unkind,

   ____  ____  ____  ___  ____  ____ etc

   "I could not love thee half so well

   "Loved I not honor more."

It were even so much better to

be stoical, and should bad news

ever reach you, bear it as did

the Spartan mothers of ancient

Greece.

I cannot write more now,

so will conclude with love to all

you dear people at home.  Believe

me, I am always thinking of you.

Your affectionate son

Jim

 

                         1 DRL 474 1/2

 

                                    No. 1 Command Depot,

                                                      Sutton Veny,  6. 9. 18.   

 

My dearest Mother,

The day after I last wrote to you I

heard that Les had been wounded, but I

have delayed writing on the offchance of

finding out the nature of his wounds.

He was wounded on 25/8, and shifted

from the 61st. C.C.T. to the 8th General Hospital,

Rouen on 31/8.  I am expecting any

day to hear he has been evacuated to

England, and hope such will be the

case before the 13th, when I go on four

days leave to London.  I was to

have gone yesterday, but have delayed

it a week on hearing the news.

I daresay you know by now, and

I sincerely hope you will not worry

overmuch dear mother, and break down

your health.  I have been worried a

great deal on your account, but of

course I await definite news of

misfortune before taking anything to

heart.  I always look at it in the 

light that it will mean a trip to

 

                              2

 

Australia for a certainty, and hope

his wounds will not prove too serious.

I shall send you a cable from

London next weekend, when I

should have definite news about Les.

I had a letter from him on the

20th 'Aug. and as I said in Ruby's

letter, the fighting was pretty severe

although our troops have done so well.

I cannot help feeling sorry to

think you will have the news about

my returning to France about the

time you hear of Les being wounded.

It is just circumstance, and I

trust you will prove as brave as

you have always been, and rely on

prayers.  Up till now we have been

very fortunate and there is no

reason to think our luck is going to

change.

Things are running smoothly here, and

my arm is alright again.  I hope I shall

have good news for you next mail, and

will conclude with much love to all

from           Your affectionate son,

                                    Jim.

 

                                                     No. 1 Command Depot,

                                                              Sutton Veny,

                                                                  Wiltshire,

                                                                                  9. 9. 18.                                     

 

My dearest Mother & Father,

Long before you receive this letter, which

I write with a heart ready to break, You

will have heard that poor old Les has

made the supreme sacrifice for his country.

I have been expecting this sad news

for ten long days and nights, the

tension during the last day or so being

almost unbearable.  When you hear of

the nature of his wounds you will know,

as I fully realize now, that it is

better so.  I had a wire from London

this afternoon to say Les died at the

8th Gen. Hosp. Rouen yesterday.  I have tried

ever since leaving hospital (6 days) to 

get leave to get across and see him,

but had not got a definite decision

up till getting the wire today.

Now I hope, dear parents,  you will

take a brave view of our misfortune,

and try to derive some consolation in

knowing that Les died in the most

 

noble and honorable way, in defence

of a his country, fighting in an

unquestionably just cause.  It is

true that we only realize the most

fearful and cruel aspect of war when

our own blood is involved, and

when sons are lost to their parents,

and brothers to sisters and brothers.

 I thank God Les had not a

wife and kiddies depending on him.

You must be thankful you have still

sons and daughters to be some

comfort to you.

I feel too upset to write further

tonight, but I shall write again in

a day or so, when I am more at

ease.   The memory of our last

parting; the few brave words and

strong grips; are is too fresh.

Rest assured I shall find out

all the news I can and let you

know as soon as possible.

I shall not be leaving England

for at least a month, perhaps not

at all now.

          Love to all from

                       Your affectionate son,

                                  Jim.                       1 DRL474 1/2

 

[*P.S. I do not forget dear Ruby is 20 today. 

It is a most shocking day here, a driving

wind and rain in torrents.    Jim.*]

 

                                                          

                                                              No. 1 Command Depōt,

                                                                         Sutton Veny, Wilts,

                                                                                   26 . 9 . 18.

 

My dear Mother,

You will see I am still at this

depōt, and my stay has been much

longer than I expected. 

I have not had any letters from home

since I last wrote -     14th July, the latest.

There should be more letters shortly.

The weather is still wet and stormy,

as one must expect at the time of

an equinox.

We have started the football season

already, and played a match against

the 1st. Training Battalion yesterday.

Two 5th Bn officers, pals of Les, were

playing against us.  They recognised

me, and spoke very kindly.  Three

or four other 5th Bn. chaps lamented

Les the loss of Les as "one of the

battalion's very best."

I hope you will not think it was

out of place for me to be playing

so soon, but you will understand

 

                             2

that I felt so worried that I was

glad of a game to forget for a while.

Somehow I am always thinking of

you now, dear mother, and wondering

if you are pining, or bearing up

bravely against misfortune as behoves

a mother of such a fine chap as

Les was.

I daresay you got my cable

alright.  Possibly you had a notification

from Defence previously.

There is absolutely no news to

tell you from this side.  The news

from Palestine and the Balkans

is very encouraging, and the Western

front has quietened down.

I shall write again shortly.

Best love to all at home

                   Your affectionate son,

                                          Jim.                           [* 1 DRL 474 1/2]

 

                                                     Pay Office,

                                                        No. 1 Command Depōt,

                                                             Sutton Veny, Wilts,

                                                                          1. 11. 18.

My dearest Mother & all at home,

I have just returned from five days

leave to Ilfracombe, North Devon, with Gary

Burston.  It was at his suggestion that

we made the trip, and I never having

been to Devonshire readily assented.  We

had a "bonzer" quiet time, enjoying the

magnificent scenery and the good  food

which is fairly plentiful there.  For the

first time since leaving home I tasted

real cream "Devonshire Clotted", and believe

me it was hard to take (I don't think).

We journeyed via Bath and Bristol, and

on my return I spent a few hours

looking around the latter city.   I have

some postcard views of Ilfracombe and

Bristol, which I shall write on and

send within a few days.

The weather, which is so uncertain

at this time of the year, kept fine - at

least it did not rain much. (It

is pouring now to make up for it)

The visiting season to Ilfracombe

ended in September, and instead of

between 30,000 and 40,000 visitors, we found

it almost deserted.  We passed most

of the time climbing the rugged cliffs

which skirt the Bristol Channel at this

part.  From the cliffs one gets a fine

view across the Channel to South Wales,

and a birds eye view of the shipping

journeying to and fro to Cardiff, Swansea

and Bristol.

 

                                  2

The mine sweepers continue their patrol

all day long and sometimes at night.

Many German submarines have met

their fate about here.

On my return I received your

Post Card of 23rd Aug. and letter of 16th Sept.

The latter is the letter written just

after you had the sad news about Les.

I cannot tell you how much I feel

for you dearest mother, and I can

well imagine the gloom the news has

thrown over our home, just when you

were living in such high hopes of his return.

I am surprised to hear that Les

was merely reported "wounded".  The

first report was "dangerously wounded",

and I have already told you of the

fearful suspense I endured for ten

long days.  I think I told you I

met a Middle Park boy named Maher

who was with Jack Barry.  He was

one of four who carried Les to the

dressing station.  He said that Les

was conscious and wonderfully calm

and brave, until they gave him morphia

at the C.C.S.    I think that from

this time onwards he was kept under

morphia, and did not suffer the

fearful agony which his wounds would

indicate.  I have told you that he

is buried at Rouen; and that probably

I shall be able to visit his grave before

I leave for home.

                                                           [*33]

 

                                   3

It is glorious news this morning

that Turkey has surrendered and

that an allied fleet is to proceed to

Constantinople and the Black Sea.

         

                                                  Later.

Jack Barry has just called in.

He came back off furlough this morning

after touring Edinburgh, Glasgow and

London.  He got some further information

for me about Les as follows:-

___________________________________________

    "Lieut G L Makin    5th Bn.

This officer was evacuated wounded

on 25/8/18.  Advice received by this unit

regarding his death is as follows :-

 "Died of Wounds  8th Gen. Hosp.   Gun shot

wounds both legs, right amputated 8/9/18.

Previously reported dangerously ill.

"This officer was leading his company

in the attack on 23/8/18, when he was

struck by a shell.

 

                                 _________   Major

                                     C.O. 5th Bn A.I.F.

____________________________________________

                    Copy of "W" 16.

" Lieut G. L. Makin   5th Bn A.I.F.

"The late Lieut G. L. Makin was admitted

into this hospital on the 31st August 1918,

suffering from G.S.W: both legs (amputation

of right) and died at 9:30 am on the

8th Sept. 1918"

"He was buried in the St. Sever Cemetery,

Rouen, on 10th Sept. 1918 Grave No. 6218."

 

                               ________________  Major R.AMC.

                                                                C.O.    8th Gen Hosp. Rouen   [*33]

 

                                                  

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