Letters from James Joseph Makin to his family 1918 - Part 4 of 6

Conflict:
First World War, 1914–18
Part of Quest:
Subject:
  • Letters
Status:
Awaiting approval
Accession number:
RCDIG0001462
Difficulty:
2

Page 1 / 10

the Wonding My osan being a public holiday We were fortunate enough No strike two successive five days and had a We went i Good time. swimming in the by Channel. Hhe water was very co old but the enjoyatle donn was very nevertheless. Last Sndey I went to an exhibition o War Lichires of Anstralian at the Grap. n Gallerie hey are ery fine milled and m il evenmally be seen Mr Auspalia suppose. DRIHTH
raa a man oig attact furthe Paper and tonights reports them at They wer disne Sh ave achieved a good mihal success. ing to be emains ree will be np etter had a fros len X days be is well and going strong He has n Wa comg back to in 2
I think it is better send mr papers direct will C the doc. 4 was dead trouble i bringin Then from Westelif be is a very busy man these at the Admiralt time seldo i Ile him at all. The anraid last Sunday ik night on London wa have missed the first There were over 200 asualties The light is failing a fmust vid? on Goodnight Londest love from 1ORIE 001
27 Cheailton Rons Munster. Park London SWN.C H. 7.18 My deagest Mother Gallat home. Your welcome letter of 915 just to hand. Smn Glad you are getting some of my letters:- There is no sign of the parcil as yet, but I live i hopes. I have some very good news. hes will not be going back to France for at least mother months. He has just written to tell me he has not got ayone to relieve him and does not expect anyone for at least a months the last few days I During Jack Richardson and have seen both old W.H.S. boys, Ron Gibsoo and from Anshatia a just arrived is in camp few weeks ago. Jack near The town of Bedford. And Ron is a St. Mn. The Ordnance Corps and is stationed in London for the present He is o Milytary Staff blerk in Melbourns, hence his stripes. You have got no idea how gladI was to see those boys. Hally Cosgrif called in to see me yesterday. OR
io over on leave from France and as just back from Scokland. He is Announer S.Sgt. in the 39th Bri- a good job. He is looking very fit and well Bill O'Briens so working with him in the Annoury and is keeping well. Don glad to hear Gordon Shirling So0 home alright. You might remember me to him and to Mrss. Stling and the girly I was ever so pleased ito let Gerkes map taken at Fravalgon. The appears to be ever so big, and a bonny little girl. snow must be a bonzer little kid. She will think it is her brithday When Les and I get back. You did not say how you enjoyed Your trip to Ballarat I hope you had a good mno. How is Auntio Kape taking the bad news about Alex.- I am writing to her by this mail 146
I had a letter from Reg. Bennes He was belling me Yesterday about the celebration of Anzac Day. think there is one of your letters missing because you have not AmacDay. Mentioned Today is American Independence Day and a great day it has been. King George. And all the heads were at Tanford Bridge to witness a famous bazeball Match between teams. Chosen from the As ding and It trished Pavr up in a big victory for the Navy The Yanks are nustling some. now and have 1029,000 troops in France by now. 276,000 for the month of time was good going The Gemnan offensive has been brought it a standstill, and in view of the Americans arriving in big lumps the situation is rather more Cheering than for some months past. I went to the National Sparting last night. The Yenks have Club
arranged a series of bosing events, known as the American and British Impire Competitions. An Aushalian named Smith (just lobbed over) wor the middleweights and another named Engine was runner up" in the Lighlweights, won by or former English Champion Seaman Hayes: This news will not be very Interesting but I just write things some into my head. em lying on Putney Heath and it is quite light enough to write at after 9 Im I must be getting home however as I muse be up before M the morning I trust. You are all enjoying the best health and keeping your spirik up to full heighs. Much from love to all four affectionate son On CORHHE EMOR 1001
Command epet 20 Sutton Ven Wilk 27. 7.18 My dearest Mother & Father, not wbe very Your will Ohusk Idon Dave hear ws Deved Dor Am and know how must More: Onc S flane disgusied feet np and passnohweliw month darg bbeen unbearabled and I finally Sot Tt Lam lad pongen threw m- the without gettin Away 8 Wr Sayn name. Against Erie a here 3 days I have been. now and Iam just dropping The life is quite stride M MB shall be feeling Egoyable and me benefit of the change in a weekssting few I shall probably be just the time England leavm this letter I am quite You Set shall come that confident have no troughs alright and
apprehensions about going back Hes in at present on a few days leave nean London, probably has last before going to France I am only about1 miles, distomnt. from his camp and shall Bll him. next Tuesday. I am. tryingto anange S. transfer to hs hngade not necessarily No his bayation. think it were best h address ty letters to my pal as follows. Sewwath 3862 D J Makin BattalionP.I.F. 21 40 bpl C. F. Guergens, 27 Chesilton Road Minster Bark Indon S.W.C When I am definitely settled shall advise yons further I met Graydon Burston an old W.H.S.b here Yesterday. He has been over in England Ci Octover and i likely to be here on a base Job for some tome 10146
I received Your large parcel the I marched out from London day one You the I was M my birthday. oot contained sent for a large cake, sugar, Cocoa, "Cape an laid Chocolate Exarettes. and of course I am very acceptable. was very Fatiful indeed letter from Dr. Sitson had a he two or three days ago saying me some papers & for had received them redirect him Kave Wld afraid they am but M to find ge never will letter from you is My larest there it a mail dated 9/5. 2315 but I about dated up to letter any have not sot must expect That by lase a white be delayed is their You again ask Frmust Now worry About Me 5 C Noth as a bank right bers an shall to almost gl fsh reat 10 MROL

2/

the Monday (this Monday) 

being a public holiday. 

We were fortunate enough 

to strike two successive 

fine days and had a 

good time.  We went in 

swimming in the Eng. 

Channel.  The water 

was very cold but the 

swim was very enjoyable 

nevertheless.  Last Sunday 

I went to an exhibition 

of Australian War Pictures

at the Grafton Galleries.  

They are very fine indeed,

and will eventually 

be seen in Australia 

I suppose.

 

1 DRL 474 1/2

 

3/

The Germans have made 

a further big attack 

and tonight's paper 

reports them across 

the River Aisne.  They 

have achieved a good 

initial success and 

it remains to be seen 

if they will be able

to follow it up. 

I had a letter from 

Leo a few days ago. 

He is well and going 

strong.  He has no 

word of going back to 

France as yet. 

 

4/

I think it is better to 

send my papers direct.

It will save the doc. a 

good deal of trouble in 

bringing them up from 

Westcliff. .  He is a

very busy man these 

times at the Admiralty 

and I seldom see 

him at all.  The 

air raid last Sunday

night week on London was 

the first I have missed..

There were over 200 

casualties.

The light is failing so 

I mist bid you goodnight. 

Fondest love from Jim.

 

27 Chesilton Road

Munster Park

London SW.6,

4.7.18

My dearest Mother & all at home,

Your welcome letter of 9/5 just to hand.

Am glad you are getting some of my 

letters.  There is no sign of the parcel 

as yet, but I live in hopes.

I have some very good news.  Les 

will not be going back to France for 

at least another month. He has just 

written to tell me he has not got

anyone to relieve him and does not

expect anyone for at least a month. 

During the last few days I 

have seen Jack Richardson and 

Ron Gibson, both old U.H.S boys, 

and just arrived from Australia a 

few weeks ago.  Jack is in camp

near the town of Bedford and Ron 

is a Sgt. in the Ordnance Corps and 

is stationed in London for the present

He is a military Staff Clerk in 

Melbourne, hence his stripes.

You have got no idea how glad I 

was to see those boys.  Wally Cosgriff 

called in to see me yesterday.  He

 

2/

is over on leave from France and 

is just back from Scotland.  He is 

Armourer S.Sgt in the 39th Bn; a good 

job.  He is looking very fit and well.

Bill O'Brien is working with him 

in the armoury and is keeping well. 

I am glad to hear Gordon 

Stirling got home alright.  You 

might remember me to him and 

to Mrs. Stirling and the girls.

I was ever so pleased to 

get Gertie's snap taken at 

Traralgon.  She appears to be ever 

so big, and a bonny little girl.

Lenore must be a bonzer little kid. 

She will think it is her birthday 

when Les and I get back.  You 

did not say how you enjoyed 

your trip to Ballarat.  I hope you 

had a good time.  How is Auntie 

Kate taking the bad news about Alex. 

I am writing to her by this mail. 

 

3/

I had a letter from Reg. Bennett 

yesterday.  He was telling me 

about the celebration of Anzac Day.

I think there is one of your letters 

missing because you have not 

mentioned Anzac Day.

Today is American Independence 

Day and a great day it has 

been.  King George and all the 

heads were at Stamford Bridge

to witness a famous baseball match 

between teams chosen from the 

U.S. Army and Navy.  It finished 

up in a big victory for the Navy.

The Yanks are hustling some, 

now, and have 1,029,000 troops in 

France by now.  276,000 for the 

month of June was good going. 

The German offensive has been 

brought to a standstill, and in 

view of the Americans arriving "in 

big lumps" the situation is rather 

more cheering than for some months 

past. 

I went to the National Sporting 

Club last night.  The Yanks have

 

4/

arranged a series of boxing 

events, known as the "American 

and British Empire Competitions."

An Australian named Smith (just 

lobbed over) won the Middleweights, 

and another named Eugene was

"runner up" in the Lghtweights, won 

by a former English champion, 

Seaman Hayes.

This news will not be very 

interesting but I just write as 

things come into my head.  I 

am lying on Putney Heath, and 

it is quite light enough to write 

at after 9pm.  I must be 

getting home however as I must 

be up before 7 in the morning. 

I trust you are all enjoying 

the best health and keeping your 

spirits up to full height.  Much 

love to all from 

Your affectionate son

Jim

1 DRL 474 1/2

 

No. 1 Comand Depot

Sutton Veny,

Wilts, 27.7.18

My dearest Mother & Father,

I trust you will not be very 

grieved to hear I have left London 

and am going to be a soldier 

once more.  You must know how 

fed up and disgusted I have 

been during the past twelve months. 

It finally got unbearable and I 

threw in the sponge.  I am glad 

to say I go away without getting 

a crime against my name. 

I have been here 3 days 

now and am just dropping

into my stride.  The life is quite 

enjoyable and I shall be feeling 

the benefit of the change in a 

few weeks time.

I shall probably be just 

leaving England by the time

you get this letter.  I am quite 

confident that I shall come 

through alright and have no 

 

2/

apprehensions about going back .

Les is at present on a few 

days leave in London, probably 

his last before going to France. 

I am only about 1½ miles distant

from his camp and shall see 

him next Tuesday.  I am 

trying to arrange a transfer to 

his brigade, not necessarily to his 

battalion.  I think it were best 

to address my letters to my pal 

as follows : -

3862 Private J.J Makin,

21st Battalion A.I.F

c/o Cpl. C F Juergens,

27 Chesilton Road,

Munster Park

London S.W.6.

When I am definitely settled I 

shall advise you further.

I met Graydon Burston, 

an old U.H.S boy, here yesterday. 

He has been over in England 

since October and, is likely to be

here on a base job for some time.

 

3/

I received your large parcel the 

day I marched out from London. 

I think it was the one you 

sent for my birthday.  It contained 

a large cake, sugar, cocoa, cafe' au lait, 

chocolate, cigarettes & and of course 

was very acceptable.  I am very 

grateful indeed.

I had a letter from Dr Gibson 

two or three days ago saying he 

had received some papers for me. 

I have told him to redirect them 

to me, but I am afraid they 

will never find me. 

My latest letter from you is 

dated 9/5.  There is a mail 

in dated about 23/5 but I 

have not got any letters up to 

date by that:  I must expect 

them to be delayed a while 

now.  I must ask you again 

not to worry about me.  I 

shall be as right as a bank. 

You must realize it is almost 

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