Letters from James Joseph Makin to his family 1918 - Part 3 of 6

Conflict:
First World War, 1914–18
Part of Quest:
Subject:
  • Letters
Status:
Awaiting approval
Accession number:
RCDIG0001462
Difficulty:
2

Page 1 / 10

and boughts meo a mall boys The Rids were came of cricket. to play with ronored for us them, and played their hardest. we went to for the evening the suburban theare to a spy- Inside the Lines. play called of the row You have no rdea kicked up by the gallery folks accors maudible almost making the The poorer Classes of Londoners are frightfully ignorant and have no Baraller in Melboume in this respect. hes is shll at Warmister You have as late I Haresay news of him as of me, as I suppose our letters travel home together. I told you, I think, that I had khrown fiures to the wind. I am now a correspondent in the Allotments Section and
3o or 40 letters to the I write various States of Australia every day. I dictate as many as a day to my eight letters right from the files typist It takes about a month before one becomes accustomed to the work, and it is about have been in Job 0 the only enlisted where. I can since show a little individuality be long in shall not another stupe on this felting if I get my I think work but of course one dues fets that, in the army seldom When the last lot of came out and I promotions you could have was excluded knocked me down with a It was a great mjustce feather. 8 and told the responsible Crent. Ctyle i Dreat
40 It remains to be seen whether he a grudge against me murse will consequence; probably he will m Brian Rush, formerly of the bustoms in Welboumne is a frent in Fiance but in a different section. Harry knows him I often see Charlee think. He is amssong It Dunn a prent. In the Engineers, and down at Talisbury stationed plams somewhere. bricket has started again The long nights i England. it no quite light enough to play at 9 octock) are suited proctice, and for plenty of Ongland Should prodce the best cricketers in the world The Westminster School, about the largest public school in London has an oval at Vincens Square right in frone of our building. this school boys If All the pass from and all cades school.
become officers. Every afternoon they are playing Cricket or I believe much foosball, and more time is devoted to sport than to learning. Looking from my rondow across to groune, I am always the for my school days longing and think of these again wasted months. Wasted long mean in my own o course but I supposed selfish light to vanquish old a helping same, and m Frity. all the perhaps the time is this sense not wasted It has been raining heavily all the morning, but sim is just beginning to the again, and shme I am tto a forward looking food afternoon. this long walk After of solid a week 1014
I breathe a sigh mdoor walk 6 Now as relief on Saherdays. food to The time when it io After months of foggy be alive. one sees the wet weekends and walking about the sim one notices the Aust- streets ralians basking like so many Their faces are fairly snakes. with the joy of being Nadians alive. On such days a these we needs must think of our sunny native land and wonder what our good people are doing I trust you are all well I should five and happy. you are not a lot to know and worrying overmuch at the time it is fetting to finish this Shastly taking and bring us back business Beal love to our loved ones your affect son and kisses from Sem IORIHEIE
Fiance Section CAllotments) A.1.F Headquarter London 26.5.18. Dearest Mother, Your everwelcome letters of 2x and To March just to hand. Tomehow when I get your letters, dear at a violens mother, I aways spasm of home sickness, and in a few moments my thoughts fly back is all my dear people so many thousands of miles overseas. I often want to write to you just as I feel when I get your letters after weeks of waiting, when I am almost too full of pleasant for expression m Iemories of home ever think my Do You writing very impersonal in lone, letters not like a son to a mother It is because I disguise my feelings with writing Commonplace news, and oueline my aports and in great, brg London, so work O that perhaps you will think that worrying of you, and not M of things whils best I am making the
I am lucky enough to be living i safety and comfort. I have often wonted to tell you how I appreciate your beautiful words motherly love. They comfort me greatly and it is pleasing to reflect that one has been some comfort and little worry tto the mother in all the world. best You were asking if I still have the crucifire and other little badges and things I brought with me. I am prond to say that I have every one, and I treasure them very dearly, because I know it is Your wish. I shall bring them all home to you some day, let us hope it will be sooner than appearances indicate at present. I shll go tto church and live up ct my religion- I try to live tleanly and though we with many pitfalls are conponted in the way of temptation, I have be always I Shall confidence that able to resist them. Last time I Les he shewed me some medals saw he brough away with him; he would
3 not lose them for mything. I had a letter from him yesterday from Warminster. He is well and cheerful and says he io likely to be here for some time yet I never hear from Harry now. from seldom to The letters passed I suppose it is my fault never. for not writing more often. I want you to keep this letter for yourself alone, dear for I know what father is. mother, He would sneer to himself, or openly perhaps, and so hurt your feelings. I shall write another tomorrow. They will for his benefit foth go by the same maib. Low does he behave these times: Believe me, I Shil as of old: am always thinking of you, and how I could have been some degree of comfort tto you in your times of worry, but for this imfortunate war. It hurt one much more than magine in leaving ever you could I daresay you home to come. thoughtless and regarded me as
I had thought ipetuous, but for months before it confinually decided I had to comer 3 fmally When I get back I know I shall appreciate home once more all the better, for the old saying is wonderfully true, absence makes I. hope The heart frow fonder. You are looking after yourself as far as possible and not overdoing That endless task of house keeping I suppose Kuby is a grand help to you now. I absolutely cannot realize Ruly quite a woman and Perce and Gert. quite grown up. When It think of you all, it so as I knew you when I left; Tertie a bonny little girl, Perce in short pants and Ruby a young jurs. I have its close now, dearest mother, as it ro setting very late. seep on smiting through your hears, pray that God will bring and us both back home to you safe sound of limb to the welcome And which Awails ais. we know from Your affectionate son, Londess love AI Iim 001
17 Genilon hoads Parsons Green London, SC 28. 5. 18. Dearest Mother a Patter I am afraid this is going to be rather a rough old letter. I have come home early and o bed, but now that one I am in bed feel like writing a letter Things are much as usual in London. I am still doing my job on Adges week m week out without much variation. The week end before last I went down to Bournemoutt or a couple of days 0014

small boys and bought into a 

game of cricket. The kids were 

honored for us to play with 

them, and played their hardest.

In the evening we went to 

the suburban theatre to a spy-

play called "Inside the Lines."

You have no idea of the row 

kicked up by the gallery folks, 

almost making the actors inaudible. 

The poorer Classes of Londoners 

are frightfully ignorant, and have 

no parallel in Melbourne in this

respect.

Les is still at Warminster.

I daresay you have as late 

news of him as of me, as 

I suppose our letters travel
home together.

I told you, I think, that I 

had thrown figures to the wind. 

I am now a correspondent 

in the Allotments Section and

 

3

I write 30 or 40 letters to the 

various States of Australia every 

day. I dictate as many as 

eighty letters a day to my 

typist, right from the files.  

It takes about a month 

before one becomes accustomed 

to the work, and it is about 

the only job I have been in

since I enlisted where I can 
show a little individuality.

I shall not be long in 

getting another stripe on this 

work I think, if I get my 

dues; but of course one  

seldom gets that in the army.

When the last lot of 

promotions came out and I

was excluded you could have 

knocked me down with a 

feather. It was a great injustice 

and I told the responsible 

Lieut off in great style.

 

4
It remains to be seen whether he

will nurse a grudge against me 

in consequence; probably he will.
Brian Rush, formerly of the

Customs in Melbourne is a Lieut 

in Finance, but in a different 

section. Harry knows him I 

think. I often see Charlie 

Dunn of Armstrong St. He is 

a Lieut in the Engineers, and 

is stationed down at Salisbury 

Plains somewhere.
Cricket has started again 

in England. The long nights 

(it is quite light enough to 

play at 9 o'clock) are suited 

for plenty of practice, and 

England should produce the 

best cricketers in the world.
The Westminster School, about 

the largest public school in London
has an oval at Vincent Square 

right in front of our building. 

All the boys of this school 

pass from cadet schools, and all

 

 

5

become officers. Every afternoon 

they are playing cricket or

football and I believe much 

more time is devoted to sport 

than to learning. Looking 

from my window across to 

the ground, I am always 

longing for my school days 

again, and think of these 

long wasted months. Wasted 

of course I mean in my own 

selfish light, but I suppose I

am helping to vanquish old

Fritz. All the same, and in

this sense perhaps the time is 

not wasted.

It has been raining 

heavily all the morning, but 

the sun is just beginning to 

shine again, and I am 

looking forward to a good 

long walk this afternoon.

After a week of solid

 

6

indoor walk I breathe a sigh 

of relief on Saturdays. Now is 

the time when it is good to 

be alive.  After months of foggy 

wet weekends, one sees the 

sun, and walking about the 

streets one notices the Aust-

ralians basking like so many 

snakes. Their faces are fairly 

radiant with the joy of being 

alive. On such days as 

these we needs must think
of our sunny native land,

and wonder what our good 

people are doing.

I trust you are all well 

and happy. I should give 

a lot to know you are not 

worrying overmuch, and 

fretting at the time it is 

taking to finish this ghastly

business and bring us back

to our loved ones. Best love 

and kisses from your affect. son, 

Jim

1 DRL 474 1/2
 

 

Finance Section
(Allotments)
A.I.F Headquarters,
London,
26.5.18.
Dearest Mother,
Your ever-welcome letters of 24th and 

30th March just to hand. Somehow  

when I get your letters, dear 

mother, I always get a violent 
spasm of home sickness, and in

a few moments my thoughts fly
back to all my dear people so 

many thousands of miles overseas.

I often want to write to you 

just as I feel when I get your 

letters after weeks of waiting, when 

I am almost too full of pleasant 

memories of home for expression in

writing. Do you ever think my 

letters very impersonal in tone, - 

not like a son to a mother?

It is because I disguise my 

feelings with writing commonplace
news, and outline my sports and 

work in great, big London, so 

that perhaps you will think I

am not worrying of you, and that

I am making the best of things while
 

 

2

I am lucky enough to be living

in safety and comfort. I have
often wanted to tell you how I 

appreciate your beautiful words of 
motherly love. They comfort me 

greatly and it is pleasing to
reflect that one has been some 

comfort and little worry to the
best mother in all the world.

You were asking if I still 

have the crucifix and other little 

badges and things I brought with me.

I am proud to say that I have 

every one, and I treasure them 

very dearly, because I know it

is your wish. I shall bring
them all home to you some day, - 

let us hope it will be sooner than
appearances indicate at present.

I still go to church and 

live up to my religion. I try 

to live cleanly, and though we 

are confronted with many pitfalls 

in the way of temptation, I have 

confidence that I shall be always 

able to resist them. Last time I
saw Les he showed me some medals 

he brought away with him; he would
 

 

3
not lose them for anything. I had 

a letter from him yesterday from
Warminster. He is well and cheerful, 

and says he is likely to be 

here for some time yet.

I never hear from Harry now. 

The letters passed from "seldom to 

never." I suppose it is my fault 

for not writing more often.

I want you to keep this 

letter for yourself alone, dear 

mother, for I know what father is. 

He would sneer to himself, or 

openly perhaps, and so hurt your

feelings. I shall write another 

for his benefit tomorrow. They will 

both go by the same mail.

How does he behave these times?  

Still as of old? Believe me, I 

am always thinking of you, and 

how I could have been some 

degree of comfort to you in your 

times of worry, but for this unfortunate 

war.  It hurt me much more than 

ever you could imagine in leaving 

home to come. I daresay you 

regarded me as thoughtless and
 

 

4

impetuous, but I had thought 

of it continually for months before 

I finally decided I had to come.

When I get back I know 

I shall appreciate home once more 

all the better, for the old saying 

is wonderfully true, "absence makes 

the heart grow fonder." I hope 

you are looking after yourself as 

far as possible and not overdoing 

that endless task of house keeping.

I suppose Ruby is a grand help 

to you now. I absolutely cannot 

realize Ruby quite a woman and 

Perce and Gert. quite grown up.

When I think of you all, it 

is as I knew you when I left, - 

Gertie a bonny little girl, Perce in 

short pants and Ruby a young girl.

I have to close now, dearest 

Mother, as it is getting very late. 

Keep on smiling through your tears, 

and pray that God will bring 

us both back home to you safe 

and sound of limb to the welcome 

which we know awaits us.

Fondest love from Your affectionate son,
Jim

 

 

27 Chesilton Road,
Parsons' Green
London, SW6,
28. 5. 18.
Dearest Mother & Father,
I am afraid this is 

going to be rather a
rough old letter. I have
come home early and
gone to bed, but now that
I am in bed I feel 
like writing a letter.

Things are much as
usual in London.
I am still doing my
job on Hdqrs week in
week out without much
variation. The week
end before last I went
down to Bournemouth
for a couple of days,
 
 

 
Last edited by:
Anneliese BAnneliese B
Last edited on:

Last updated: