Letters from James Joseph Makin to his family, 1915-1916, Part 11 of 12

Conflict:
First World War, 1914–18
Part of Quest:
Subject:
  • Letters
Status:
Awaiting approval
Accession number:
RCDIG0001425
Difficulty:
3

Page 1 / 6

Comnty of Lond Mar M Lital Epson Surrey, 10/8/16 Dearet Mother & dather, There is a mail closing here this evening for Melboume, so I am giving you the latest news. I am glad to say am feeling 41. now, and am getting up tomorrow for a walk in the grounds. The hospital was formerly an Bsylum and it has splendid gardens sports ground, and a concert hall. This part of Turrey is said to be very pretty. I mall be able to tell you more of this in a week or sos time. We are only 12 omles from London which is now out of bounds Ao Hustralians e not heard from Les since come to England, but expect a letter any day now. He is back with his bastalion I think I sent him my diary to England early Mr June, but I think he had left England before he got it. At any rate he has not said he got it. I am very disheardered and do not feel much iclmed to write tese mes. 1OR
There has been a splendid run of weather over here, - no rain for about three weeks at least. It is very mild of an evening here, and gite close indoors. The nurses are very kind and we get treated very well here a living on fish, eggs and pudding, so I ought to soon pick up alright. am looking forward to some letters. I have written to France and given them my address here. The last mail I have is 30/5/16. o see a few Instration papers here now and then. There is really very little news 2 tell you just now. I shall write you a more interesting letter next week. Your affectionate son Jim P.S. Ihave a lat of Hs to send Ruly and Gerke, but have no envelopes lange aough just now. 0014
EPSOM, SURREV. 18/8/16. Dearest Mother & Father, I thought I would take a walk down to the C.D.A Copsomg with the Post Cards I had written, as it was such a glorious afternoon. I soon found this place, a sort of Y.M.E.A, ha rooms with a nice little writing Se. room in et. Then I thought might as well drofd you a line; this is the history of the circumstances connected with the writing of this letter Oy the way these are not my finger prinks, either
2 Epsom, where the English Derby is rin, is at present full of soldiers of every English Tommies discription, Aushalians, Canadians New Zealanders, and a few from South Africa and Fi. Some are in camp training tto shortly leave for France but most of them have already been there, and have been lither wounded or ioalided home sick. There are geveral comps within half an hours walk of the town containing about 14,000 soldiers. The largest is a convalescent Camp for Canadians and Hustralians
3 sitnated at Woodcote. expect to go there, if cannot manage to get to Castbowme (somewhere on the It would be fine Coast I. get to the sea just So as the weather is now hat and sultry. Some friends of less the Misses Fairfax - came to the nospital last Saunday. I think you told me you had one of those H0s- a group meluding hes Capt. Gibson the Misses Fairfax. They sent me one yesterday. hes looks well in it, aont You think so?
The Is are very nice people you know the cort, who speak with great precision and care I am afraid I should feel horribly out of place if I accept then invitation to visit them in London; which I must do, I suppose Capt. Gibson wrote a very nice letter asking it hed could do aything for me and mirting me to day him- a few days with very embarrassing for a poor baksheesh? private. I hope he does not msist. Will, dear Deople, this so all the paper I have, so & Must close with best love fll next Maif to all our affectionate don i 101

Country of London War Hospital,

Epsom,

Surrey,     10/8/16

 

Dearest Mother & Father,

There is a mail closing here this

evening for Melbourne, so I am giving

you the latest news.  I am glad to say

I am feeling A1 now, and am getting

up tomorrow for a walk in the grounds.

The hospital was formerly an Asylum,

and it has splendid gardens , ^a sports

ground, and ^a Concert hall.  This

part of Surrey is said to be very

pretty.  I shall be able to tell you

more of this in a week or so's time.

We are only 12 miles from London,

which is now "out of bounds" to Australians.

I have not heard from Les. since I

came to England, but expect a letter any

day now.  He is back with his battalion,

I think.

I sent him my diary to England early

in June, but I think he had left England

before he got it.  At any rate he has not

said he got it.  I am very disheartened

and do not feel much inclined to write

these times.

 

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                         2/

There has been a splendid run 

of weather over here, - no rain for

about three weeks at least.  It is

very mild of. an evening here, and

quite close indoors.

The nurses are very kind and

we get treated very well here.  I

am living on fish, eggs and

pudding, so I ought to soon pick

up alright.

I am looking forward to some

letters.  I have written to France and

given them my address here.  The

last mail I have is 30/5/16.

I see a few Australian papers

here now and then.

There is really very little news to

tell you just now.

I shall write you a more

interesting letter next week.

Your affectionate son,

Jim

P.S. I have a lot of PIC's to send Ruby

and Gertie, but have no envelopes

large enough just now.

 

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EPSOM,

SURREY.

18/8/16.

 

Dearest Mother & Father,

I thought I would take 

a walk down to the G.P.O.

(Epsom) with the Post Cards

I had written, as it was

such a glorious afternoon.

I soon found this place, -

a sort of Y.M.C.A, tea-rooms,

Etc., with a nice little writing

room in it.

Then I thought I

might as well drop you a

line; this is the history 

of the circumstances

connected with the writing

of this letter.

(By the way, these are not my

finger prints, either)

 

AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL  RCDIG0001425

 

                   2/

Epsom, where the English

Derby is run, is at present

full of soldiers of every

description, - English Tommies,

Australians, Canadians, New

Zealanders, and a few from

South Africa and Fiji.  Some

are in camp training to

shortly leave for France, but 

most of them have already

been there, and have been

either wounded or invalided

home sick.

There are several camps

within half an hour's walk

of the town containing about

14,000 soldiers.  The largest

is a Convalescent Camp

for Canadians and Australians

 

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                 3/

situated at Woodcote.  I

expect to go there, if I

cannot manage to get to

Eastbourne (somewhere on the

coast).  It would be fine 

to get to the sea just

now, as the weather is

hot and sultry.

Some friends of Les's - the

Misses Fairfax - came to the

hospital last Saturday.  I

think you told me you had

one of those PIC's - a group

including Les, Capt. Gibson,

& the Misses Fairfax.  They

sent me one yesterday.  Les

looks well in it, don't

you think so?

 

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                 4/

The F's are very nice people.

You know the sort, who speak

with great precision and care.

I am afraid I should 

feel horribly out of place if

I accept their invitation to

visit them in London, -

which I must do, I suppose.

Capt. Gibson wrote a very

nice letter asking if he 

could do anything for me,

and inviting me to stay

a few days with him -

very embarrassing for a

poor "baksheesh'" Private.

I hope he does not insist.

Well, dear People, this is

all the paper I have, so I 

must close with best love

to all till next mail.

Your affectionate son,

Jim

 

AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL  RCDIG0001425

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